Get into the Wild @ Deakin University

A showcase of environmental orientated things that our staff and students do, as well as things we find interesting. If you like it, maybe you should be studying with us :-)
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos
We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.
Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 
Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.
More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.
It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.
So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/180th
ISO
400
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

The only way to get better at photography is to take more photos

We all love great images of plants and animals etc. I know I spend a lot of my time on field programs trying to take good images of the mammals and birds we catch, but beetles and bugs have been off my radar.

Recently, whilst in the Grampians on our 2nd year field program for SLE226 (Team based environmental research), I was given a challenge by Dr Nick Porch, our crazy beetle person. The challenge went something like this “Ok, lets swap lenses! I will take your big lens and you can take my super macro lens. The challenge is to take a macro image of a beetle, a spider, a millipede, a springtail and a bug.” 

Being somewhat competitive, and in real need of practice with a macro lens, I of course accepted the challenge. It turned out to be a tough challenge, not only did I need to get the photos, I had to find the little creatures in winter. I am glad to report the challenge was completed within 2 hours (See above).  Whilst the image quality leaves a lot to be desired, compared to the amazing images Dr Nick takes, I was happy. The images in order are of 2 beetles, 2 spiders, a millipede, springtails on a kangaroo poo and a bug.

More interesting for me than the photos were the lessons learned.

  1. It is really hard to take a good extreme close up macro image (technical understanding).
  2. You need to really know what you are doing to find your target group (biological understanding)
  3. You really need to practice photography all the time to really understand your camera.

So get out there and start taking photos!!! You will see great things, get better with your camera, and learn interesting things about the things you take photos of.


Flyway Print Exchange Exhibition
 
Venue:   No Vacancy Gallery, The Atrium, Federation Square
When: 11th – 28th   September
Opening:  6pm  Thursday 11th September 2014
                       By Sean Dooley
 
Beautiful selection of wood cuts, etchings, lino-cuts and mono-prints featuring shorebirds by printmakers from Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Indonesia and India.
All works are for sale and profits to go to shorebird research.  

Flyway Print Exchange Exhibition

 

Venue:   No Vacancy Gallery, The Atrium, Federation Square

When: 11th – 28th   September

Opening:  6pm  Thursday 11th September 2014

                       By Sean Dooley

 

Beautiful selection of wood cuts, etchings, lino-cuts and mono-prints featuring shorebirds by printmakers from Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Indonesia and India.

All works are for sale and profits to go to shorebird research.  

Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.
Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.
Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
400
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Dicyrtomidae, perhaps Dicyrtomina sp.
Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.
Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.
Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Neanuridae: Neanurinae
Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.
Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.
Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Acanthanura sp. (Neanuridae: Uchidanurinae)
Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.
Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.
Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Neanuridae: Neanurinae
Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.
Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.
Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Neanuridae: Pseudachorutinae

Sunday Afternoon at Kallista: Happy Little Springtails.

Yesterday I spent a couple of hours in the Dandenong Ranges National Park at Kallista. I didn’t move more than 10 metres in the whole 4 hours and was within 20 metres of a major road. I was rewarded for my stasis with about 200 reasonable invert and other little things images. These are the springtails (Collembola). I could have stayed weeks and continued to get fresh things to take pictures of.

Perhaps my favorite (and I think that of many collembolaphiles) is the lovely, distinctive, springtail genus Acanthanura (middle). This genus belongs to the neanurid subfamily Uchidanurinae which has representatives in Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Micronesia and southeast Asia. Acanthanura itself is reasonably common in and under rotting wood in wet forest habitats in southeastern Australia and Tasmania.

(Source: nick-porch)

"My Best Wildlife Photo" was a cracker
We put out the call through Tumblr and Twitter to find your best ever wildlife image.  It was amazing to see the response and the fantastic images that were submitted. The following links are to images submitted. Please view them and take in the amazing wildlife images people submitted (Share and Retweet your favourites).
Thank you to everyone who shared with us their best ever wildlife image. It certainly displays the amazing diversity of animals as well as the photographic talent that exists out there.
Superb Lyrebird http://t.co/6zqZkRZVka by Carol Probets
Snow-White Tern http://t.co/wNzLkugFAZ by Judy
Mouse spider http://t.co/JiBq81Y6d7 by Judy
Thorny Devil http://t.co/RrrzEr8FLr by Euan Ritchie
Arctic Fox http://t.co/lJP7AcMpoz by Mike Weston
Echidna http://t.co/4RCGLndE6n by Adam Cardilini
Burton’s Legless Lizard http://t.co/HFTHj7Dhch by Billy Geary
Powerful Owl http://t.co/eBClzMnFEC by Raylene Cooke
Pin-tailed Whydah http://t.co/3KD8W07119 by Daniel Lees
Yellow-lipped sea krait http://t.co/e19qTyAGfs by Alice
Leopard http://t.co/c1DMGIvWAB by Susannah Hale
Crested Tern http://t.co/Kq72eJRbmc by Maggie Watson
Australasian Gannet http://t.co/kIZ6uGfZjT by Mel
Forest Kingfisher http://t.co/tmjuvfaL0N by Beau Meney
Juvenile Wren http://t.co/LH7UZDkZkE by Sorver
Crab http://t.co/Qo7rpEu5x3 by M.Sid Kelly
Green Python http://t.co/SRvjDQdsus by Stephen Zozaya
Macaque http://t.co/nuD6wcS8wx by Sea Wild Earth
Western Tarsier http://t.co/q6Q3ggyCIE by John White
Baby Pygmy Possum http://t.co/gJqbIyGJap by Dale Nimmo
Peregrine Falcon http://t.co/yiqhvXSKVt by Nick Bradsworth
Botany Bay Weevil http://t.co/kczsOak64k by Michael McCarthy
Yellow-billed Spoonbill http://t.co/AY4yWmUlVC by Anthony Rendall
Forest red-tailed Black Cockatoo http://t.co/9XOKUexPl8 by Tim Doherty
Gould’s Monitors http://t.co/AWUxVJ0NjC by Tim Doherty
Wandering spider http://t.co/i4KRMDPzI0 by Dave Watson
Curl snake http://t.co/AoENxvPvwl by Damian Michael
Lord Howe Island Currawong http://t.co/3C6cKYoatr by Andrew Taylor
Brolga http://t.co/u6luow6LAe by Jo Wood
Bamboo pit viper http://t.co/jHYjOA7O0O by Rishab Pillai
Great white shark http://t.co/N1MR7e3Dxs by Raylene Cooke
Red-mouthed stromb http://t.co/xPWccUvaz2 by Baerbel Koribalski
Aperture
f/7.6
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
100
Focal Length
5mm
Camera
Nikon COOLPIX S5100
"My Best Wildlife Photo" was a cracker
We put out the call through Tumblr and Twitter to find your best ever wildlife image.  It was amazing to see the response and the fantastic images that were submitted. The following links are to images submitted. Please view them and take in the amazing wildlife images people submitted (Share and Retweet your favourites).
Thank you to everyone who shared with us their best ever wildlife image. It certainly displays the amazing diversity of animals as well as the photographic talent that exists out there.
Superb Lyrebird http://t.co/6zqZkRZVka by Carol Probets
Snow-White Tern http://t.co/wNzLkugFAZ by Judy
Mouse spider http://t.co/JiBq81Y6d7 by Judy
Thorny Devil http://t.co/RrrzEr8FLr by Euan Ritchie
Arctic Fox http://t.co/lJP7AcMpoz by Mike Weston
Echidna http://t.co/4RCGLndE6n by Adam Cardilini
Burton’s Legless Lizard http://t.co/HFTHj7Dhch by Billy Geary
Powerful Owl http://t.co/eBClzMnFEC by Raylene Cooke
Pin-tailed Whydah http://t.co/3KD8W07119 by Daniel Lees
Yellow-lipped sea krait http://t.co/e19qTyAGfs by Alice
Leopard http://t.co/c1DMGIvWAB by Susannah Hale
Crested Tern http://t.co/Kq72eJRbmc by Maggie Watson
Australasian Gannet http://t.co/kIZ6uGfZjT by Mel
Forest Kingfisher http://t.co/tmjuvfaL0N by Beau Meney
Juvenile Wren http://t.co/LH7UZDkZkE by Sorver
Crab http://t.co/Qo7rpEu5x3 by M.Sid Kelly
Green Python http://t.co/SRvjDQdsus by Stephen Zozaya
Macaque http://t.co/nuD6wcS8wx by Sea Wild Earth
Western Tarsier http://t.co/q6Q3ggyCIE by John White
Baby Pygmy Possum http://t.co/gJqbIyGJap by Dale Nimmo
Peregrine Falcon http://t.co/yiqhvXSKVt by Nick Bradsworth
Botany Bay Weevil http://t.co/kczsOak64k by Michael McCarthy
Yellow-billed Spoonbill http://t.co/AY4yWmUlVC by Anthony Rendall
Forest red-tailed Black Cockatoo http://t.co/9XOKUexPl8 by Tim Doherty
Gould’s Monitors http://t.co/AWUxVJ0NjC by Tim Doherty
Wandering spider http://t.co/i4KRMDPzI0 by Dave Watson
Curl snake http://t.co/AoENxvPvwl by Damian Michael
Lord Howe Island Currawong http://t.co/3C6cKYoatr by Andrew Taylor
Brolga http://t.co/u6luow6LAe by Jo Wood
Bamboo pit viper http://t.co/jHYjOA7O0O by Rishab Pillai
Great white shark http://t.co/N1MR7e3Dxs by Raylene Cooke
Red-mouthed stromb http://t.co/xPWccUvaz2 by Baerbel Koribalski
"My Best Wildlife Photo" was a cracker
We put out the call through Tumblr and Twitter to find your best ever wildlife image.  It was amazing to see the response and the fantastic images that were submitted. The following links are to images submitted. Please view them and take in the amazing wildlife images people submitted (Share and Retweet your favourites).
Thank you to everyone who shared with us their best ever wildlife image. It certainly displays the amazing diversity of animals as well as the photographic talent that exists out there.
Superb Lyrebird http://t.co/6zqZkRZVka by Carol Probets
Snow-White Tern http://t.co/wNzLkugFAZ by Judy
Mouse spider http://t.co/JiBq81Y6d7 by Judy
Thorny Devil http://t.co/RrrzEr8FLr by Euan Ritchie
Arctic Fox http://t.co/lJP7AcMpoz by Mike Weston
Echidna http://t.co/4RCGLndE6n by Adam Cardilini
Burton’s Legless Lizard http://t.co/HFTHj7Dhch by Billy Geary
Powerful Owl http://t.co/eBClzMnFEC by Raylene Cooke
Pin-tailed Whydah http://t.co/3KD8W07119 by Daniel Lees
Yellow-lipped sea krait http://t.co/e19qTyAGfs by Alice
Leopard http://t.co/c1DMGIvWAB by Susannah Hale
Crested Tern http://t.co/Kq72eJRbmc by Maggie Watson
Australasian Gannet http://t.co/kIZ6uGfZjT by Mel
Forest Kingfisher http://t.co/tmjuvfaL0N by Beau Meney
Juvenile Wren http://t.co/LH7UZDkZkE by Sorver
Crab http://t.co/Qo7rpEu5x3 by M.Sid Kelly
Green Python http://t.co/SRvjDQdsus by Stephen Zozaya
Macaque http://t.co/nuD6wcS8wx by Sea Wild Earth
Western Tarsier http://t.co/q6Q3ggyCIE by John White
Baby Pygmy Possum http://t.co/gJqbIyGJap by Dale Nimmo
Peregrine Falcon http://t.co/yiqhvXSKVt by Nick Bradsworth
Botany Bay Weevil http://t.co/kczsOak64k by Michael McCarthy
Yellow-billed Spoonbill http://t.co/AY4yWmUlVC by Anthony Rendall
Forest red-tailed Black Cockatoo http://t.co/9XOKUexPl8 by Tim Doherty
Gould’s Monitors http://t.co/AWUxVJ0NjC by Tim Doherty
Wandering spider http://t.co/i4KRMDPzI0 by Dave Watson
Curl snake http://t.co/AoENxvPvwl by Damian Michael
Lord Howe Island Currawong http://t.co/3C6cKYoatr by Andrew Taylor
Brolga http://t.co/u6luow6LAe by Jo Wood
Bamboo pit viper http://t.co/jHYjOA7O0O by Rishab Pillai
Great white shark http://t.co/N1MR7e3Dxs by Raylene Cooke
Red-mouthed stromb http://t.co/xPWccUvaz2 by Baerbel Koribalski
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
"My Best Wildlife Photo" was a cracker
We put out the call through Tumblr and Twitter to find your best ever wildlife image.  It was amazing to see the response and the fantastic images that were submitted. The following links are to images submitted. Please view them and take in the amazing wildlife images people submitted (Share and Retweet your favourites).
Thank you to everyone who shared with us their best ever wildlife image. It certainly displays the amazing diversity of animals as well as the photographic talent that exists out there.
Superb Lyrebird http://t.co/6zqZkRZVka by Carol Probets
Snow-White Tern http://t.co/wNzLkugFAZ by Judy
Mouse spider http://t.co/JiBq81Y6d7 by Judy
Thorny Devil http://t.co/RrrzEr8FLr by Euan Ritchie
Arctic Fox http://t.co/lJP7AcMpoz by Mike Weston
Echidna http://t.co/4RCGLndE6n by Adam Cardilini
Burton’s Legless Lizard http://t.co/HFTHj7Dhch by Billy Geary
Powerful Owl http://t.co/eBClzMnFEC by Raylene Cooke
Pin-tailed Whydah http://t.co/3KD8W07119 by Daniel Lees
Yellow-lipped sea krait http://t.co/e19qTyAGfs by Alice
Leopard http://t.co/c1DMGIvWAB by Susannah Hale
Crested Tern http://t.co/Kq72eJRbmc by Maggie Watson
Australasian Gannet http://t.co/kIZ6uGfZjT by Mel
Forest Kingfisher http://t.co/tmjuvfaL0N by Beau Meney
Juvenile Wren http://t.co/LH7UZDkZkE by Sorver
Crab http://t.co/Qo7rpEu5x3 by M.Sid Kelly
Green Python http://t.co/SRvjDQdsus by Stephen Zozaya
Macaque http://t.co/nuD6wcS8wx by Sea Wild Earth
Western Tarsier http://t.co/q6Q3ggyCIE by John White
Baby Pygmy Possum http://t.co/gJqbIyGJap by Dale Nimmo
Peregrine Falcon http://t.co/yiqhvXSKVt by Nick Bradsworth
Botany Bay Weevil http://t.co/kczsOak64k by Michael McCarthy
Yellow-billed Spoonbill http://t.co/AY4yWmUlVC by Anthony Rendall
Forest red-tailed Black Cockatoo http://t.co/9XOKUexPl8 by Tim Doherty
Gould’s Monitors http://t.co/AWUxVJ0NjC by Tim Doherty
Wandering spider http://t.co/i4KRMDPzI0 by Dave Watson
Curl snake http://t.co/AoENxvPvwl by Damian Michael
Lord Howe Island Currawong http://t.co/3C6cKYoatr by Andrew Taylor
Brolga http://t.co/u6luow6LAe by Jo Wood
Bamboo pit viper http://t.co/jHYjOA7O0O by Rishab Pillai
Great white shark http://t.co/N1MR7e3Dxs by Raylene Cooke
Red-mouthed stromb http://t.co/xPWccUvaz2 by Baerbel Koribalski

"My Best Wildlife Photo" was a cracker

We put out the call through Tumblr and Twitter to find your best ever wildlife image.  It was amazing to see the response and the fantastic images that were submitted. The following links are to images submitted. Please view them and take in the amazing wildlife images people submitted (Share and Retweet your favourites).

Thank you to everyone who shared with us their best ever wildlife image. It certainly displays the amazing diversity of animals as well as the photographic talent that exists out there.

Superb Lyrebird http://t.co/6zqZkRZVka by Carol Probets

Snow-White Tern http://t.co/wNzLkugFAZ by Judy

Mouse spider http://t.co/JiBq81Y6d7 by Judy

Thorny Devil http://t.co/RrrzEr8FLr by Euan Ritchie

Arctic Fox http://t.co/lJP7AcMpoz by Mike Weston

Echidna http://t.co/4RCGLndE6n by Adam Cardilini

Burton’s Legless Lizard http://t.co/HFTHj7Dhch by Billy Geary

Powerful Owl http://t.co/eBClzMnFEC by Raylene Cooke

Pin-tailed Whydah http://t.co/3KD8W07119 by Daniel Lees

Yellow-lipped sea krait http://t.co/e19qTyAGfs by Alice

Leopard http://t.co/c1DMGIvWAB by Susannah Hale

Crested Tern http://t.co/Kq72eJRbmc by Maggie Watson

Australasian Gannet http://t.co/kIZ6uGfZjT by Mel

Forest Kingfisher http://t.co/tmjuvfaL0N by Beau Meney

Juvenile Wren http://t.co/LH7UZDkZkE by Sorver

Crab http://t.co/Qo7rpEu5x3 by M.Sid Kelly

Green Python http://t.co/SRvjDQdsus by Stephen Zozaya

Macaque http://t.co/nuD6wcS8wx by Sea Wild Earth

Western Tarsier http://t.co/q6Q3ggyCIE by John White

Baby Pygmy Possum http://t.co/gJqbIyGJap by Dale Nimmo

Peregrine Falcon http://t.co/yiqhvXSKVt by Nick Bradsworth

Botany Bay Weevil http://t.co/kczsOak64k by Michael McCarthy

Yellow-billed Spoonbill http://t.co/AY4yWmUlVC by Anthony Rendall

Forest red-tailed Black Cockatoo http://t.co/9XOKUexPl8 by Tim Doherty

Gould’s Monitors http://t.co/AWUxVJ0NjC by Tim Doherty

Wandering spider http://t.co/i4KRMDPzI0 by Dave Watson

Curl snake http://t.co/AoENxvPvwl by Damian Michael

Lord Howe Island Currawong http://t.co/3C6cKYoatr by Andrew Taylor

Brolga http://t.co/u6luow6LAe by Jo Wood

Bamboo pit viper http://t.co/jHYjOA7O0O by Rishab Pillai

Great white shark http://t.co/N1MR7e3Dxs by Raylene Cooke

Red-mouthed stromb http://t.co/xPWccUvaz2 by Baerbel Koribalski

(Source: deakin-environment, via deakin-environment)

Soft release of a Red-capped Plover at night

Last Sunday night was warm, and brought with it the first success of the season with respect to capturing male red-capped plovers (the males do the night shift of incubation, the females do the day shift). As always, we like to let the birds reorient themselves before they fly, so we keep them near us so they are safe until they choose to leave us.

Why do these species stay close to water?
Evidence grows that waterbirds such as Dusky Moorhen (top), Eurasian Coot (bottom left) and Purple Swamphen (bottom right) stay by water because it is a refuge from predators. Check out some recent research involving Deakin University: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11273-014-9376-0
Why do these species stay close to water?
Evidence grows that waterbirds such as Dusky Moorhen (top), Eurasian Coot (bottom left) and Purple Swamphen (bottom right) stay by water because it is a refuge from predators. Check out some recent research involving Deakin University: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11273-014-9376-0
Why do these species stay close to water?
Evidence grows that waterbirds such as Dusky Moorhen (top), Eurasian Coot (bottom left) and Purple Swamphen (bottom right) stay by water because it is a refuge from predators. Check out some recent research involving Deakin University: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11273-014-9376-0

Why do these species stay close to water?

Evidence grows that waterbirds such as Dusky Moorhen (top), Eurasian Coot (bottom left) and Purple Swamphen (bottom right) stay by water because it is a refuge from predators. Check out some recent research involving Deakin University: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11273-014-9376-0

School of Life and Environmental Sciences

Honours Information Session - Melbourne Burwood Campus

Date: Wednesday 3 September

Time: 5.00 – 6.30pm

Location: T1.11

Honours Information Session – Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus

Date: Wednesday 3 September

Time: 12.00 – 1.00pm

Location: ka4.207

Honours Information Session - Warrnambool Campus

Date: Thursday 11 September

Time: 1.00 – 2.20pm

Location: F3.04

Back yard predators
It is always fascinating to watch the events of the natural world occur before your eyes. Amazing things even happen in our gardens and remind us that predator-prey interactions are not just limited to natural landscapes. This kookaburra caught this poor marsh frog in my back yard on the weekend in front of the kids. That was pretty cool. The kookaburra then proceeded to ‘tenderize’ the frog against the tree. This is a nice way of saying it smashed the frog repeatedly against the branch before eating it. The kids were very impressed, if not a little upset for the frog.
The lesson here, keep an eye out where ever you are. Amazing things happen in the strangest places for those that have their eyes open.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Back yard predators
It is always fascinating to watch the events of the natural world occur before your eyes. Amazing things even happen in our gardens and remind us that predator-prey interactions are not just limited to natural landscapes. This kookaburra caught this poor marsh frog in my back yard on the weekend in front of the kids. That was pretty cool. The kookaburra then proceeded to ‘tenderize’ the frog against the tree. This is a nice way of saying it smashed the frog repeatedly against the branch before eating it. The kids were very impressed, if not a little upset for the frog.
The lesson here, keep an eye out where ever you are. Amazing things happen in the strangest places for those that have their eyes open.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Back yard predators
It is always fascinating to watch the events of the natural world occur before your eyes. Amazing things even happen in our gardens and remind us that predator-prey interactions are not just limited to natural landscapes. This kookaburra caught this poor marsh frog in my back yard on the weekend in front of the kids. That was pretty cool. The kookaburra then proceeded to ‘tenderize’ the frog against the tree. This is a nice way of saying it smashed the frog repeatedly against the branch before eating it. The kids were very impressed, if not a little upset for the frog.
The lesson here, keep an eye out where ever you are. Amazing things happen in the strangest places for those that have their eyes open.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

Back yard predators

It is always fascinating to watch the events of the natural world occur before your eyes. Amazing things even happen in our gardens and remind us that predator-prey interactions are not just limited to natural landscapes. This kookaburra caught this poor marsh frog in my back yard on the weekend in front of the kids. That was pretty cool. The kookaburra then proceeded to ‘tenderize’ the frog against the tree. This is a nice way of saying it smashed the frog repeatedly against the branch before eating it. The kids were very impressed, if not a little upset for the frog.

The lesson here, keep an eye out where ever you are. Amazing things happen in the strangest places for those that have their eyes open.

Deakin maps weeds using drones

A BirdLife Australia project being conducted in conjunction with Deakin University will be using 3 dimensional imaging collected from a drone to establish the success and geomorphological impacts of dune weed removal. These projects are designed to help re-establish habitat for the Hooded Plover in western Victoria.  This video demonstrates the technology at work. Stand by for updates. 

(Source: mikeaweston)

Welcome to Gynandromorph Land - your never going home.
When you are out in the field you see some strange things…sometimes you’d prefer not to see them. When you’re in the lab you might see some great stuff and you have a bit more control there…thankfully. This is one of the most surprising things I’ve ever come across in the lab and it’s certainly something I’m glad I found because it has opened my eyes to a fascinating new world.
Sorting a leaf litter berlesate from forest in southeastern Australia I was finding that the sexually dimorphic males and females of one tiny spider species (a micropholcommatinae anapid) were very abundant (dozens of each). In the image above the female is on the left and the male is on the right. The male has large palps and has a chitinous scute on the dorsal surface of the abdomen. The female has small palps and a distinctive spotty abdominal pattern. The one in the middle has both characters of the male and of the female. What does that mean?
It means simply that that this single little spider is a gynandromorph - in this case a lateral gynandromorph - the left half of the spider is female and the right half is male. Gynandromorphy is well-known in spiders and other taxa but is not especially common; Pontus Palmgren (1979) - oh what a brilliant name - estimated from one sample of 70,000 spiders that gynandromorphs occur at a rate of around 1:17,000 in spiders. A biologist might work on their particular group of organisms and never come across one during their entire career.
I suppose I was just lucky, both in finding a gynandromorph and coming across Pontus Palmgren.
One of the surprising Many Little Things!
Pontus Palmgren. 1979. On the frequency of gynandromorphic spiders. Annales Zoologici Fennici 16, 183-185.

Welcome to Gynandromorph Land - your never going home.

When you are out in the field you see some strange things…sometimes you’d prefer not to see them. When you’re in the lab you might see some great stuff and you have a bit more control there…thankfully. This is one of the most surprising things I’ve ever come across in the lab and it’s certainly something I’m glad I found because it has opened my eyes to a fascinating new world.

Sorting a leaf litter berlesate from forest in southeastern Australia I was finding that the sexually dimorphic males and females of one tiny spider species (a micropholcommatinae anapid) were very abundant (dozens of each). In the image above the female is on the left and the male is on the right. The male has large palps and has a chitinous scute on the dorsal surface of the abdomen. The female has small palps and a distinctive spotty abdominal pattern. The one in the middle has both characters of the male and of the female. What does that mean?

It means simply that that this single little spider is a gynandromorph - in this case a lateral gynandromorph - the left half of the spider is female and the right half is male. Gynandromorphy is well-known in spiders and other taxa but is not especially common; Pontus Palmgren (1979) - oh what a brilliant name - estimated from one sample of 70,000 spiders that gynandromorphs occur at a rate of around 1:17,000 in spiders. A biologist might work on their particular group of organisms and never come across one during their entire career.

I suppose I was just lucky, both in finding a gynandromorph and coming across Pontus Palmgren.

One of the surprising Many Little Things!

Pontus Palmgren. 1979. On the frequency of gynandromorphic spiders. Annales Zoologici Fennici 16, 183-185.

(Source: nick-porch)

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