Get into the Wild @ Deakin University

A showcase of environmental orientated things that our staff and students do, as well as things we find interesting. If you like it, maybe you should be studying with us :-)
New Reports Offer Clearest Picture Yet of Rising Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Brian Clark Howard
National Geographic
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 21, 2014

Two days before the UN Climate Summit in New York, three new studies paint the clearest picture yet of rising greenhouse gas emissions and the dwindling opportunity for staving off the worst impacts—and also of at least one way that huge undertaking might be shared fairly among the nations of the world.
“The overall outlook is rather bleak,” says Steven J. Davis, a climate scientist at the University of California, Irvine, who co-authored a paper published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change on how nations might share in reducing their carbon emissions.
Davis points to the “Global Carbon Budget 2014,” which was published Sunday in the journal Earth System Science Data Discussions. Produced by dozens of scientists from around the world, it’s the latest in a series of annual reports showing that “we’re moving in the wrong direction,” says Davis.
“We’re talking a lot about putting the brakes on emissions, but we’re actually accelerating.”
According to the new carbon budget, global greenhouse gas emissions rose by 2.3 percent in 2013 over 2012. The authors estimate that emissions will riseanother 2.5 percent in 2014, to a level that is 65 percent above emissions in 1990—the benchmark year established in the Kyoto Protocol.
Meanwhile the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere exceeded 395 parts per million (ppm) in 2013. That’s an increase of more than 40 percent from the 277 ppm concentration in 1750, before the Industrial Revolution. (See “Greenhouse Gases Hit Record High Amid Fears of CO2 Saturation Point.”)
Country Breakdowns
According to a review paper published Sunday in Nature Geoscience by an international team led by Pierre Friedlingstein of the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, three countries accounted for more than 90 percent of the growth in emissions from 2012 to 2013: China (57 percent), the United States (20 percent), and India (17 percent).
The fourth major emitter, the European Union, actually cut its emissions in 2013, such that the global rise was 11 percent less than it otherwise would have been.
What’s particularly striking, says University of Wisconsin climate scientist Galen A. McKinley, is that China is now emitting more on a per capita basis than the European Union, for the first time in history.
“In 2007 China overtook the U.S. in overall carbon emissions, but on a per capita basis we always thought of them as much smaller,” says McKinley, who was not involved in the research published Sunday. “But since then their emissions have been rising rapidly.”
According to the Nature Geoscience review, the world’s emissions in 2013 were 5 metric tons per person. China’s were 7.2 metric tons per person, the U.S. produced 16.4, the EU produced 6.8, and India produced 1.9. In 1990, China produced 2.2 metric tons per person, and the United States produced 19.1.
Cumulative emissions from 1870 to 2013 total 1,430 gigatons for the world, including 161 gigatons from China, 370 from the U.S., 328 from the European Union, and 44 from India.
Another important conclusion from the data is the role the state of the economy plays in emissions, notes Davis. “A lot of people thought the reason the U.S. emissions were down [in recent years] was because of the natural gas boom, in that we have substituted gas for coal,” he says. Natural gas emits about half as much CO2 as coal to produce the same amount of electricity.
Switching coal-fired power plants to gas has indeed helped slow emissions, Davis says, “but if you dig in deeper you see that a lot of the reason why our emissions were down was because of the recession, and with the economy improving they are on the rise again.” Relatively cold winters have also required the use of more fuel for heating.
read more from Nat Geo
photo from GREG GIRARD, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

New Reports Offer Clearest Picture Yet of Rising Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Brian Clark Howard

National Geographic

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 21, 2014

Two days before the UN Climate Summit in New York, three new studies paint the clearest picture yet of rising greenhouse gas emissions and the dwindling opportunity for staving off the worst impacts—and also of at least one way that huge undertaking might be shared fairly among the nations of the world.

“The overall outlook is rather bleak,” says Steven J. Davis, a climate scientist at the University of California, Irvine, who co-authored a paper published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change on how nations might share in reducing their carbon emissions.

Davis points to the “Global Carbon Budget 2014,” which was published Sunday in the journal Earth System Science Data Discussions. Produced by dozens of scientists from around the world, it’s the latest in a series of annual reports showing that “we’re moving in the wrong direction,” says Davis.

“We’re talking a lot about putting the brakes on emissions, but we’re actually accelerating.”

According to the new carbon budget, global greenhouse gas emissions rose by 2.3 percent in 2013 over 2012. The authors estimate that emissions will riseanother 2.5 percent in 2014, to a level that is 65 percent above emissions in 1990—the benchmark year established in the Kyoto Protocol.

Meanwhile the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere exceeded 395 parts per million (ppm) in 2013. That’s an increase of more than 40 percent from the 277 ppm concentration in 1750, before the Industrial Revolution. (See “Greenhouse Gases Hit Record High Amid Fears of CO2 Saturation Point.”)

Country Breakdowns

According to a review paper published Sunday in Nature Geoscience by an international team led by Pierre Friedlingstein of the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, three countries accounted for more than 90 percent of the growth in emissions from 2012 to 2013: China (57 percent), the United States (20 percent), and India (17 percent).

The fourth major emitter, the European Union, actually cut its emissions in 2013, such that the global rise was 11 percent less than it otherwise would have been.

What’s particularly striking, says University of Wisconsin climate scientist Galen A. McKinley, is that China is now emitting more on a per capita basis than the European Union, for the first time in history.

“In 2007 China overtook the U.S. in overall carbon emissions, but on a per capita basis we always thought of them as much smaller,” says McKinley, who was not involved in the research published Sunday. “But since then their emissions have been rising rapidly.”

According to the Nature Geoscience review, the world’s emissions in 2013 were 5 metric tons per person. China’s were 7.2 metric tons per person, the U.S. produced 16.4, the EU produced 6.8, and India produced 1.9. In 1990, China produced 2.2 metric tons per person, and the United States produced 19.1.

Cumulative emissions from 1870 to 2013 total 1,430 gigatons for the world, including 161 gigatons from China, 370 from the U.S., 328 from the European Union, and 44 from India.

Another important conclusion from the data is the role the state of the economy plays in emissions, notes Davis. “A lot of people thought the reason the U.S. emissions were down [in recent years] was because of the natural gas boom, in that we have substituted gas for coal,” he says. Natural gas emits about half as much CO2 as coal to produce the same amount of electricity.

Switching coal-fired power plants to gas has indeed helped slow emissions, Davis says, “but if you dig in deeper you see that a lot of the reason why our emissions were down was because of the recession, and with the economy improving they are on the rise again.” Relatively cold winters have also required the use of more fuel for heating.

read more from Nat Geo

photo from GREG GIRARD, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

(Source: scienceyoucanlove)

Marine Biology Warrnambool: outdoor classrooms on campus!

These images highlight the ideal location of the Warrnambool Campus, which is situated on the banks of the Hopkins River and very close to nearby lakes, rivers, wetlands and the open coast. Therefore, fieldwork activities, such as dip-netting and water quality testing, can literally take place on Deakin’s doorstep as illustrated in the images belowimage

First year fieldwork on the banks of the Hopkins estuary directly below the Student University Bar

If you are into coastal areas and marine biology, you should be studying Marine Biology or Fisheries and Aquaculture at Deakin University, Warrnambool. 

For more information on Marine Biology, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/marine-biology

For more information on fisheries and Aquaculture, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture

What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/183th
ISO
80
Focal Length
3mm
Camera
iPhone 4
What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/339th
ISO
80
Focal Length
3mm
Camera
iPhone 4
What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/7.1
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
100
Focal Length
80mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
100
Focal Length
40mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/8
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
65mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
What will our landscapes look like under climate change?
Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.
It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.
We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)
Some things we have seen so far:-
Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.
Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.
Aperture
f/8
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
100
Focal Length
28mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

What will our landscapes look like under climate change?

Climate change is predicted to lead to lower rainfall, generally higher temperatures and more extreme summer weather (in south eastern Australia). This will be punctuated by extreme rainfall events leading to floods. So what could this mean for our landscapes? Ultimately, it is probably going to mean more frequent fire events, that are bigger and more intense with the odd flood thrown in for good measure.

It is interesting to think about what this may mean for the animals in landscapes that become more fire affected. It is very difficult to predict what may happen, and as such a considerable amount of research around the world is investigating just that. At Deakin we have a number of studies investigating how systems respond to fire.  One such study is the long-term post-fire study in the Grampians developed in conjunction with Parks Victoria. The Grampians landscape has been significantly impacted by fire in recent time. Major wildfires in 2006, 2013 and 2014 now see approximately 90% of the entire landscape burnt since 2006 (the images above are after the 2013 and 2014 fire events). This is not ideal for many of the mammal species which will respond to vegetation that is a long time post-fire. A flood event in 2011 topped off an interesting period of drought and warm conditions.

We have monitored small mammals at 36 sites annually since 2008 (almost 70,000 trap nights of data), plus we have monitored small mammal survival immediately after the 2013 and 2014 fires (over 300 camera trap locations). We have now had 12 honours students and 1 PhD student working in this landscape since 2008. Every year of monitoring brings with it new understanding of how landscapes may respond to climate change conditions, but of course leads to more questions :-)

Some things we have seen so far:-

  • Small mammal numbers boom after flood events
  • Drought conditions lead to a very rapid contraction in small mammal numbers (bust)
  • Some individuals are able to survive in areas immediately after large fires and may be the source of future populations (in situ survival)
  • More productive areas of the landscape (those areas in gullies an topographic sinks) are likely to recover faster after fire, and act as refuges during drought conditions.

Ultimately, the data we collect and the knowledge of the systems we work in will lead to more informed management of landscapes under climate change conditions. It is incredibly difficult for land managers like Parks Victoria to balance all the various issues that occur in landscapes, climate change just throws in another difficult challenge.

Population trends and fear in birds
This recent paper involving Deakin presents the relationship between population trends and flight initiation distances (FIDs) across three continents. It seems that American birds do not follow the predicted pattern, whereby birds with longer FIDs tend to be declining.
This paper is available free of charge: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0107883

Population trends and fear in birds

This recent paper involving Deakin presents the relationship between population trends and flight initiation distances (FIDs) across three continents. It seems that American birds do not follow the predicted pattern, whereby birds with longer FIDs tend to be declining.

This paper is available free of charge: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0107883

(Source: mikeaweston)

Hi Mike,

Just wanted to let you know that I received and accepted an offer for a graduate job with the Department of the Environment in Canberra for 2015.

I wanted to say a big thank you to you and all the lecturers who made the course extremely engaging and enjoyable.

Many thanks,

DW

Minutes ago I recieved this email from one of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology graduates………..GREAT news :)

Want to be a Marine Biologist or Fisheries Scientist?

See what inspired our students to study marine biology and fisheries and aquaculture at Deakin University and why they love studying at our Warrnambool campus. See how our students get to experience the marine environment first hand with numerous field trips and opportunities to interact with marine ecosystems, whilst also having access to our boat “Yolla” and underwater vehicles that provide opportunities to identify marine plants and animals across the seabed.

If you’re interested in marine biology, fisheries and aquaculture, Deakin is the place for you.

Find out more, check http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture and http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/marine-biology

World class aquaculture facility up and running in Warrnambool 
Warrnambool is considered to be the birthplace of aquaculture, with the earliest records of any aquaculture practice being eel farming in 6,000 BC by the indigenous Gunditjmara people in south-west Victoria. This week in Warrnambool, 8,000 years later, one of the most advanced recirculating aquaculture systems in the world has just been fully commissioned, with salt water flowing through the system.
The Aquatic Animal House Facility in Warrnambool is one of Deakin University’s cutting-edge assets used for research and teaching purposes. Students of the Bachelor course in Fisheries and Aquaculture, as well as Honours and PhD students, and Deakin academics can now access this remarkable facility, with 5 independent multi-tanks systems and complete environmental control, where all sorts of aquatic animals can be housed and studied, from freshwater to marine, from temperature to tropical, from invertebrates to fish.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture
Aperture
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1/30th
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World class aquaculture facility up and running in Warrnambool 
Warrnambool is considered to be the birthplace of aquaculture, with the earliest records of any aquaculture practice being eel farming in 6,000 BC by the indigenous Gunditjmara people in south-west Victoria. This week in Warrnambool, 8,000 years later, one of the most advanced recirculating aquaculture systems in the world has just been fully commissioned, with salt water flowing through the system.
The Aquatic Animal House Facility in Warrnambool is one of Deakin University’s cutting-edge assets used for research and teaching purposes. Students of the Bachelor course in Fisheries and Aquaculture, as well as Honours and PhD students, and Deakin academics can now access this remarkable facility, with 5 independent multi-tanks systems and complete environmental control, where all sorts of aquatic animals can be housed and studied, from freshwater to marine, from temperature to tropical, from invertebrates to fish.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture
Aperture
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Camera
iPhone 5s
World class aquaculture facility up and running in Warrnambool 
Warrnambool is considered to be the birthplace of aquaculture, with the earliest records of any aquaculture practice being eel farming in 6,000 BC by the indigenous Gunditjmara people in south-west Victoria. This week in Warrnambool, 8,000 years later, one of the most advanced recirculating aquaculture systems in the world has just been fully commissioned, with salt water flowing through the system.
The Aquatic Animal House Facility in Warrnambool is one of Deakin University’s cutting-edge assets used for research and teaching purposes. Students of the Bachelor course in Fisheries and Aquaculture, as well as Honours and PhD students, and Deakin academics can now access this remarkable facility, with 5 independent multi-tanks systems and complete environmental control, where all sorts of aquatic animals can be housed and studied, from freshwater to marine, from temperature to tropical, from invertebrates to fish.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture
Aperture
f/2.2
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Camera
iPhone 5s
World class aquaculture facility up and running in Warrnambool 
Warrnambool is considered to be the birthplace of aquaculture, with the earliest records of any aquaculture practice being eel farming in 6,000 BC by the indigenous Gunditjmara people in south-west Victoria. This week in Warrnambool, 8,000 years later, one of the most advanced recirculating aquaculture systems in the world has just been fully commissioned, with salt water flowing through the system.
The Aquatic Animal House Facility in Warrnambool is one of Deakin University’s cutting-edge assets used for research and teaching purposes. Students of the Bachelor course in Fisheries and Aquaculture, as well as Honours and PhD students, and Deakin academics can now access this remarkable facility, with 5 independent multi-tanks systems and complete environmental control, where all sorts of aquatic animals can be housed and studied, from freshwater to marine, from temperature to tropical, from invertebrates to fish.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture
Aperture
f/2.2
Shutter Speed
1/120th
ISO
320
Focal Length
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Camera
iPhone 5s

World class aquaculture facility up and running in Warrnambool

Warrnambool is considered to be the birthplace of aquaculture, with the earliest records of any aquaculture practice being eel farming in 6,000 BC by the indigenous Gunditjmara people in south-west Victoria. This week in Warrnambool, 8,000 years later, one of the most advanced recirculating aquaculture systems in the world has just been fully commissioned, with salt water flowing through the system.

The Aquatic Animal House Facility in Warrnambool is one of Deakin University’s cutting-edge assets used for research and teaching purposes. Students of the Bachelor course in Fisheries and Aquaculture, as well as Honours and PhD students, and Deakin academics can now access this remarkable facility, with 5 independent multi-tanks systems and complete environmental control, where all sorts of aquatic animals can be housed and studied, from freshwater to marine, from temperature to tropical, from invertebrates to fish.

Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture

Spy Glass on the Past- Warrnambool Harbour, Australia 1870.

Time machines might not exist but ARCGIS Storymaps are giving Warrnambool residents a chance to go back more than 140 years to see how the city has changed. Click on the SPY GLASS IN THE PAST LINK ABOVE TO VENTURE BACK IN TIME

The app was developed by third year Deakin University marine biology student Silvia San Laureano Quiñones in conjunction with Senior Lecturer in the School of Life and Environmental Sciences Dr Daniel Ierodiaconou. Through the skills she developed Ms San Laureano Quiñones was offered a position at Moyne Shire prior to finishing her degree.

Dr Ierodiaconou said the 1870 map highlights changes in the coastal environment. “You can see the shoreline has changed by more than 400 metres due to sediment accumulation in Lady Bay following the construction of the breakwater and blocking of Viaduct Road leading to it,” he said. 

“In some instances we’ve seen over nine metres of sediment accumulate.”

Dr Ierodiaconou said the app would be useful for geography students and anyone interested in environmental change.

“I think people will be fascinated to see how much has changed. If you were standing at the location of the pavilion- a popular seaside restaurant in the 1870s you would have been in two or three metres of water.”

The maps also have soundings in fathoms which Deakin scientists are using to compare to data collected with their sonar mapping system on finer timescales to better understand changes in the bay.

People viewing the map can also see plants which the scientists believe show the location of giant kelp beds. “This is quite interesting as it shows evidence that these giant kelp beds have persisted through time,” Dr Ierodiaconou said.

It is believed that the largest giant kelp bed on mainland Australia is located in Lady Bay with these forests support high biodiversity and extending to depths of 12 metres. The Marine biology team at Deakin Warrnambool are using some of the latest advances in technology such as sonar, remotely operated vehicles and aerial drones to better understand these coastal marine ecosystems.

Dr Ierodiaconou said he hoped web-based communication would play an important role in sharing information on the university’s seafloor mapping initiatives and showing the public the variety of marine habitats in the region.

He also hopes it will help to revive interest in artistic mapping.

The 1870 map was drawn by Navy Lieutenant H. J. Stanley. “Because he did such a good job of drawing it to scale, we were able to scan that image and can accurately compare how things have changed,” Dr Ierodiaconou said.

“Warrnambool is a great place to study marine biology and fisheries and aquaculture,” Dr Ierodiaconou said.

“More than 90 per cent of the plant and animal communities found in our temperate waters of Australia are found nowhere else on Earth, not to mention the prized abalone and rock lobster fisheries at our doorstep. There are not many places in the world where students supplement their meals by the rich bounty in the coastal waters and river systems.”

If you are into coastal areas and marine biology, you should be studying Marine Biology or Fisheries and Aquaculture at Deakin University, Warrnambool. 

For more information on Marine Biology, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/marine-biology

For more information on fisheries and Aquaculture, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture

(Source: danierodeakin, via deakin-environment)

Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/4
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
40mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
400
Focal Length
150mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/8
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
400
Focal Length
70mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/7.1
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
400
Focal Length
135mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
400
Focal Length
135mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
85mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/100th
ISO
640
Focal Length
120mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/7.1
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
400
Focal Length
150mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
85mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo
Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!
Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.
Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/100th
ISO
400
Focal Length
85mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

Welcome to the Jungle: Hands on field surveys in Borneo

Ever dreamed of going to Borneo and surveying the jungle wildlife? Imagined surveying for frogs at night in a jungle stream? Well at Deakin, if you study any one of our Environmental Science degrees you could realise your dream!

Here are a few images from our field surveys conducted in Borneo last year. These surveys were carried out in Bung Bratak with the University of Malaysias Institute for Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation as part of SLE353 (Conservation and sustainability an Asian perspective). We are heading back to Borneo again in November with 16 new students for the adventure of a life time.

Check us out at http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/environment

Rise of the Ecology Drones

This animation shows Deakin Ecology Drones mapping coastal change. Using drones, third year project students collected data pre and post major storm events to assess their impact on coastal systems.  Collecting this type of data can be challenging in temperate coastal zones due to issues with cloud cover, the expenses associated with data capture using satellite sensors and the temporal coverage that can be achieved. Deakin staff and students have developed a cost-effective aerial platform to fill this knowledge gap.

The animation shows changes to beach slope, vegetation and mitigation efforts following a major storm event in Warrnambool Harbour July 2014.

If you are into coastal areas and marine biology, you should be studying Marine Biology or Fisheries and Aquaculture at Deakin University, Warrnambool. 

For more information on Marine Biology, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/marine-biology

For more information on fisheries and Aquaculture, check out http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/fisheries-and-aquaculture

How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/4
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
25mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/20th
ISO
160
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 4S
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
500
Focal Length
100mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
500
Focal Length
85mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/13
Shutter Speed
1/400th
ISO
500
Focal Length
28mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
500
Focal Length
28mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
500
Focal Length
28mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
500
Focal Length
190mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/4.5
Shutter Speed
1/50th
ISO
2500
Focal Length
60mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
How do you catch a small mammal?
One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.
The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.
The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).
The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.
A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.
The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.
Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/6th
ISO
400
Focal Length
135mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

How do you catch a small mammal?

One of the questions we get asked a lot is “how do you catch all the small animals you work on?”. For this post we are, therefore, going to focus on some of the approaches used to survey for small to medium sized mammals. This is a big group of species ranging from ground mammals like rats and mice, through to bats and small primates like tarsier.  The first point worth making is that catching species for research is an art, and each species is more prone to being captured by a particular approach. For that reason we will use multiple methods when conducting field surveys for both our research, and when teaching our students how to survey mammals. Another critical factor when using traps is what sort of bait to use? We will not cover baits and lures here, only to say it is complex, and each person has their own ‘witches brew’ they swear by.

The top image is an Elliott trap, it is a light weight, collapsible trap made from aluminum. They are used extensively for small ground mammals such as rodents, Antechinus and pygmy possums. The advantage of these traps is that you can put out lots of them at any one time. When conducting surveys we may have as many as 300 running at any one time.

The next image is a cage trap. They are bigger than Elliott traps and tend to catch larger ground mammals such as bandicoots and potoroos.  They are also useful for species such as the black rat who just don’t like going in an Elliott trap (we refer to these guys as trap shy).

The following 3 images show our students establishing pitfall trap lines. For pitfall trapping large buckets are buried in the ground and a drift net runs between the buckets. Animals encounter the drift net and run along it until they drop into the bucket. These are very useful for some small mammals species such as dunnarts and pygmy possums. They are also great for catching reptiles and invertebrates.

A new emerging approach to ‘trapping’ animals is displayed in the next 3 images. These are camera traps being set up by our students in Cape Otway. The camera trap is a motion triggered camera that takes a photo of anything that walks in front of it. They are extremely useful and can be modified to target all sorts of animals, from larger animals such as deer and foxes all the way down to mice and rats.

The final two images are of a harp trap and a mist net. These two approaches are used for surveying bats. Mist nets are also used extensively for surveying birds. When we are in Borneo mist nets are run day and night. During the day we get birds, and at night we get bats and if you are very lucky a tarsier jumping through the jungle.

Hopefully this has given you a small taste of some of the approaches used to catch mammals for research etc. Our students are taught to use various combinations of these approaches in Cape Conran (SLE114), Cape Otway (SLE302) and the jungles of Borneo (SLE353).  A key focus of our Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree is to teach our students to use many different field biology approaches and to get familiar with safely handling and working with wild animals.  For more information see http://www.deakin.edu.au/study-at-deakin/find-a-course/wildlife-and-conservation-biology

Many - Hidden - Little Things!
When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.
In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).
Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Many - Hidden - Little Things!
When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.
In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).
Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Many - Hidden - Little Things!
When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.
In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).
Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Throsid beetle and sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera)
Many - Hidden - Little Things!
When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.
In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).
Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Millipede and mite
Many - Hidden - Little Things!
When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.
In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).
Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
200
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
Pillomena meraca and mites
Many - Hidden - Little Things!

When taking pictures of some of the Many Little Things I often focus so hard on the task at hand that I don’t notice all that is going on. This photo-set gives examples: the principal foci of the images were the larger organisms, but in each example there are smaller things in the picture too, sometimes obvious, sometimes not so.

In the first image the large ant was the focus but, remarkably in retrospect, the smaller ant carrying what may be a bug went unnoticed. In the second the focus was the aleocharine staphylinid (Coloeptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae) but off to the right was a lovely little springtail (Collembola). In the third a tiny little (c. 1 mm) sphaeropsocid book-louse (Psocoptera) wandered into the image of a throscid beetle (Coleoptera: Throscidae) - these booklice are rarely encountered with very few records in southeastern Australia. The final two images show mites (Acarina) hidden in plain view: in the case of the millipede a tiny mite in the wood crack on the bottom right, and in the final image of the charopid land snail Pillomena meraca two mite species immediately to the left of the snail (see if you can find the smallest one!).

Pics 1 & 3 from the southern Grampians region and others from Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.

(Source: nick-porch)

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