Get into the Wild @ Deakin University

A showcase of environmental orientated things that our staff and students do, as well as things we find interesting. If you like it, maybe you should be studying with us :-)
During my undergrad degree at Deakin I was lucky enough to complete my Professional Practice placement in South Africa. We radio tracked Cheetahs, monitored southern Ground Hornbill nests, observed the feeding hierarchy of hyenas and the movements of elephants throughout the park. During our surveys we stumbled upon a fresh leopard kill wedged in a tree and there, just below it was this beautiful lady leopard attempting to keep a hyena away! Best. Day. Ever :) 

During my undergrad degree at Deakin I was lucky enough to complete my Professional Practice placement in South Africa. We radio tracked Cheetahs, monitored southern Ground Hornbill nests, observed the feeding hierarchy of hyenas and the movements of elephants throughout the park. During our surveys we stumbled upon a fresh leopard kill wedged in a tree and there, just below it was this beautiful lady leopard attempting to keep a hyena away! Best. Day. Ever :) 

Global Environmental Placement in South Africa


Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).


As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Global Environmental Placement in South Africa


Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).


As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Global Environmental Placement in South Africa


Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).


As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/4
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
160
Focal Length
10mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28

Global Environmental Placement in South Africa

Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).

As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.

Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.

Photo Comp Entry
Here is mine, an Arctic Fox, in the tundra in Siberia. A long time ago and a long way away. Taken on 35mm slide, and scanned, this fox was caching goose eggs near where I lay. In winter the fur is all white, this animal is moulting and is half way between a winter and summer coat. I had to get pretty close to take this, but I reckon it was worth the wait.

The image has been used in magazines and in Lonely Planet books.

Photo Comp Entry

Here is mine, an Arctic Fox, in the tundra in Siberia. A long time ago and a long way away. Taken on 35mm slide, and scanned, this fox was caching goose eggs near where I lay. In winter the fur is all white, this animal is moulting and is half way between a winter and summer coat. I had to get pretty close to take this, but I reckon it was worth the wait.

The image has been used in magazines and in Lonely Planet books.

Cameras for conservation
Check this out (and thanks Dan for these images!) - a long lens, patience, and a metal banded bird gets snapped, with such high resolution and clarity that the number on the metal leg band is readable! We use metal leg bands on all birds we catch, but the coloured flags (with letters or numbers allowing individual identification) is only fitted when the bird is older - so when we see metal-only banded birds that means we have banded the bird as a chick.

Having read this band thanks to Dan’s image, we now know this was a bird which was a chick a few years ago, and we are now radio-tracking one of its chicks. Great to see different generation of lapwings.
Cameras for conservation
Check this out (and thanks Dan for these images!) - a long lens, patience, and a metal banded bird gets snapped, with such high resolution and clarity that the number on the metal leg band is readable! We use metal leg bands on all birds we catch, but the coloured flags (with letters or numbers allowing individual identification) is only fitted when the bird is older - so when we see metal-only banded birds that means we have banded the bird as a chick.

Having read this band thanks to Dan’s image, we now know this was a bird which was a chick a few years ago, and we are now radio-tracking one of its chicks. Great to see different generation of lapwings.

Cameras for conservation

Check this out (and thanks Dan for these images!) - a long lens, patience, and a metal banded bird gets snapped, with such high resolution and clarity that the number on the metal leg band is readable! We use metal leg bands on all birds we catch, but the coloured flags (with letters or numbers allowing individual identification) is only fitted when the bird is older - so when we see metal-only banded birds that means we have banded the bird as a chick.

Having read this band thanks to Dan’s image, we now know this was a bird which was a chick a few years ago, and we are now radio-tracking one of its chicks. Great to see different generation of lapwings.

Elk on a beach!

As a keen beachologist, I am always interested in what species use beaches. I would not have guessed Elk would use beaches, but they do, at least sometimes!

(Source: mikeaweston)

Who’s Horny?
This morning I’ve been making a guide to the southern Grampians dung-beetles (as you do) for a student project for Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Science unit SLE226 (Environmental Team Based Research). It has meant looking a little closer at these functionally critical mini-beasts…and horny beasts they can be!
Here we have, from top to bottom:
1. the male of Onthophagus australis a common species in southeastern Australia. 2. A minor male of Onthophagus pronus a similarly widespread but less commonly encountered species, this time lacking horns on the head - but it has (not visible here) a long horn on the pronotum. 3. the male of Onthophagus taurus, an introduced species, and 4. the lovely neat little hornless head of Onthophagus posticus, a distinctive little stripey species from southern Victoria and neighbouring regions.
So now you know.
Who’s Horny?
This morning I’ve been making a guide to the southern Grampians dung-beetles (as you do) for a student project for Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Science unit SLE226 (Environmental Team Based Research). It has meant looking a little closer at these functionally critical mini-beasts…and horny beasts they can be!
Here we have, from top to bottom:
1. the male of Onthophagus australis a common species in southeastern Australia. 2. A minor male of Onthophagus pronus a similarly widespread but less commonly encountered species, this time lacking horns on the head - but it has (not visible here) a long horn on the pronotum. 3. the male of Onthophagus taurus, an introduced species, and 4. the lovely neat little hornless head of Onthophagus posticus, a distinctive little stripey species from southern Victoria and neighbouring regions.
So now you know.
Who’s Horny?
This morning I’ve been making a guide to the southern Grampians dung-beetles (as you do) for a student project for Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Science unit SLE226 (Environmental Team Based Research). It has meant looking a little closer at these functionally critical mini-beasts…and horny beasts they can be!
Here we have, from top to bottom:
1. the male of Onthophagus australis a common species in southeastern Australia. 2. A minor male of Onthophagus pronus a similarly widespread but less commonly encountered species, this time lacking horns on the head - but it has (not visible here) a long horn on the pronotum. 3. the male of Onthophagus taurus, an introduced species, and 4. the lovely neat little hornless head of Onthophagus posticus, a distinctive little stripey species from southern Victoria and neighbouring regions.
So now you know.
Who’s Horny?
This morning I’ve been making a guide to the southern Grampians dung-beetles (as you do) for a student project for Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Science unit SLE226 (Environmental Team Based Research). It has meant looking a little closer at these functionally critical mini-beasts…and horny beasts they can be!
Here we have, from top to bottom:
1. the male of Onthophagus australis a common species in southeastern Australia. 2. A minor male of Onthophagus pronus a similarly widespread but less commonly encountered species, this time lacking horns on the head - but it has (not visible here) a long horn on the pronotum. 3. the male of Onthophagus taurus, an introduced species, and 4. the lovely neat little hornless head of Onthophagus posticus, a distinctive little stripey species from southern Victoria and neighbouring regions.
So now you know.

Who’s Horny?

This morning I’ve been making a guide to the southern Grampians dung-beetles (as you do) for a student project for Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Science unit SLE226 (Environmental Team Based Research). It has meant looking a little closer at these functionally critical mini-beasts…and horny beasts they can be!

Here we have, from top to bottom:

1. the male of Onthophagus australis a common species in southeastern Australia. 2. A minor male of Onthophagus pronus a similarly widespread but less commonly encountered species, this time lacking horns on the head - but it has (not visible here) a long horn on the pronotum. 3. the male of Onthophagus taurus, an introduced species, and 4. the lovely neat little hornless head of Onthophagus posticus, a distinctive little stripey species from southern Victoria and neighbouring regions.

So now you know.

(Source: nick-porch)

Best wildlife images has gone international!

This recently settled crab, and a few others, found their kelp holdfast washed up on Mad River Beach  after a storm in Humboldt County, California. We took some pictures and put the kelp back in the water. Probably slim odds, but a second chance seemed worth a try.
This great image was provided by M. Sid Kelly who is a salmon biologist in Humbolt County, California.  You can follow him on Twitter @MSidKelly. Lots of great images from the California coast!  -The Deakin Enviro Team

Best wildlife images has gone international!

This recently settled crab, and a few others, found their kelp holdfast washed up on Mad River Beach after a storm in Humboldt County, California. We took some pictures and put the kelp back in the water. Probably slim odds, but a second chance seemed worth a try.

This great image was provided by M. Sid Kelly who is a salmon biologist in Humbolt County, California.  You can follow him on Twitter @MSidKelly. Lots of great images from the California coast!  -The Deakin Enviro Team

Hard to choose just one great wildlife photo, but for me it was difficult to go past this Peregrine falcon photo I took last year. I volunteered to help band chicks for two days, and while the chicks were being collected off the side of sheer cliffs, I stayed safe and was presented with great opportunities for in flight photos of the adults. In this particular photo, a female has finished one dive-bomb (onto the person collecting the chicks), and is banking to reposition herself for another dive! I love this photo as it shows how aerodynamic these birds are, and shows the intensity in her eyes of her commitment to protecting her chicks.
Nick Bradsworth - 2nd/3rd year Wildlife and Conservation Biology student.

Hard to choose just one great wildlife photo, but for me it was difficult to go past this Peregrine falcon photo I took last year. I volunteered to help band chicks for two days, and while the chicks were being collected off the side of sheer cliffs, I stayed safe and was presented with great opportunities for in flight photos of the adults. In this particular photo, a female has finished one dive-bomb (onto the person collecting the chicks), and is banking to reposition herself for another dive! I love this photo as it shows how aerodynamic these birds are, and shows the intensity in her eyes of her commitment to protecting her chicks.

Nick Bradsworth - 2nd/3rd year Wildlife and Conservation Biology student.

The competition is hotting up!
This amazing image was provided by Stephen through Twitter. There is going to be a bit of hard work required to beat some of these photos. Keep them coming - The Deakin Enviro Team
Stephen Zozaya is an ecologist and photographer based in Townsville, Queensland. His obsession with wildlife—reptiles and amphibians in particular—takes him to a variety of stunning places, such as Iron Range National Park, where this green python (Morelia viridis) was photographed. This photo appears as the cover of the Sept/Oct 2013 issue of Australian Geographic, and was highly commended for the Animal Portrait category of the 2013 ANZANG photography competition. 

The competition is hotting up!

This amazing image was provided by Stephen through Twitter. There is going to be a bit of hard work required to beat some of these photos. Keep them coming - The Deakin Enviro Team

Stephen Zozaya is an ecologist and photographer based in Townsville, Queensland. His obsession with wildlife—reptiles and amphibians in particular—takes him to a variety of stunning places, such as Iron Range National Park, where this green python (Morelia viridis) was photographed. This photo appears as the cover of the Sept/Oct 2013 issue of Australian Geographic, and was highly commended for the Animal Portrait category of the 2013 ANZANG photography competition. 

Another amazing image!!
My wildlife photo is this image of a beautiful Australasian gannet (Morus serrator) lovingly gazing down at it’s chick at Pope’s eye, Port Phillip bay. My most favourite animal, gannets rule both sky & water like no other. Being such a powerfully ferocious bird, it’s always so lovely to see the gentle interactions with it’s chick or partner which is why I love this image. Mel

Another amazing image!!

My wildlife photo is this image of a beautiful Australasian gannet (Morus serrator) lovingly gazing down at it’s chick at Pope’s eye, Port Phillip bay. My most favourite animal, gannets rule both sky & water like no other. Being such a powerfully ferocious bird, it’s always so lovely to see the gentle interactions with it’s chick or partner which is why I love this image. Mel

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