Get into the Wild @ Deakin University

A showcase of environmental orientated things that our staff and students do, as well as things we find interesting. If you like it, maybe you should be studying with us :-)
Upstanding Athemistus Longhorn!
Longhorn beetles (Family: Cerambycidae) are known for their very long antennae which often exceed the length of the body. Athemistus is almost an exception because the antennae are relatively short; around body length or even a little shorter. This species is most likely Athemistus bituberculatus Pascoe, described in 1867 from the ‘Mountains of Victoria’. This specimen was photographed in the Dandenong Ranges National Park on the eastern outskirts of Melbourne. There are 37 described species of Athemistus ranging from the Wet Tropics of Queensland to the cool temperate environs of the Dandenongs, many of which are illustrated in the lovely Australian Longhorn Beetles book by Adam Slipinski and Hermes Escalona.
Upstanding Athemistus Longhorn!
Longhorn beetles (Family: Cerambycidae) are known for their very long antennae which often exceed the length of the body. Athemistus is almost an exception because the antennae are relatively short; around body length or even a little shorter. This species is most likely Athemistus bituberculatus Pascoe, described in 1867 from the ‘Mountains of Victoria’. This specimen was photographed in the Dandenong Ranges National Park on the eastern outskirts of Melbourne. There are 37 described species of Athemistus ranging from the Wet Tropics of Queensland to the cool temperate environs of the Dandenongs, many of which are illustrated in the lovely Australian Longhorn Beetles book by Adam Slipinski and Hermes Escalona.
Aperture
f/13
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
400
Focal Length
98mm
Camera
Canon EOS 7D

Upstanding Athemistus Longhorn!

Longhorn beetles (Family: Cerambycidae) are known for their very long antennae which often exceed the length of the body. Athemistus is almost an exception because the antennae are relatively short; around body length or even a little shorter. This species is most likely Athemistus bituberculatus Pascoe, described in 1867 from the ‘Mountains of Victoria’. This specimen was photographed in the Dandenong Ranges National Park on the eastern outskirts of Melbourne. There are 37 described species of Athemistus ranging from the Wet Tropics of Queensland to the cool temperate environs of the Dandenongs, many of which are illustrated in the lovely Australian Longhorn Beetles book by Adam Slipinski and Hermes Escalona.

(Source: nick-porch)

The Tree Whisperer to talk at Deakin
Conservationist Tony Rinaudo (dubbed “the tree whisperer” for his extensive revegetation work in Africa) is coming to Deakin to give a talk (2pm, 30th July in L1.08 on the Burwood campus). He’s an amazing person and has extensive work in preventing desertification. The event is being organised by the Deakin Christian Union because Tony has been working with World Vision and is a christian himself but The Enviro club is helping to promote this event as he is also going to talk about his work in promoting sustainable agriculture in Africa and now East Timor.  

If you want more information about Tony Rinaudo here is an interesting article about him which includes a video http://www.smh.com.au/environment/the-tree-whisperer-20140421-36ze4.html

The Tree Whisperer to talk at Deakin

Conservationist Tony Rinaudo (dubbed “the tree whisperer” for his extensive revegetation work in Africa) is coming to Deakin to give a talk (2pm, 30th July in L1.08 on the Burwood campus). He’s an amazing person and has extensive work in preventing desertification. The event is being organised by the Deakin Christian Union because Tony has been working with World Vision and is a christian himself but The Enviro club is helping to promote this event as he is also going to talk about his work in promoting sustainable agriculture in Africa and now East Timor.  

If you want more information about Tony Rinaudo here is an interesting article about him which includes a video http://www.smh.com.au/environment/the-tree-whisperer-20140421-36ze4.html

The director of a major palm oil company in Indonesia has been found guilty of illegally clearing peat forest in Sumatra and sentenced to 8 months in jail. The director of PT Kallista Alam was also fined 150 million rupiah (about 13,000 US$), with a further 3-month sentence if the fine is not paid. PT Kallista Alam is appealing the verdict. For more, visit http://time2transcend.wordpress.com/2014/07/16/palm-oil-company-director-sentenced-to-jail-for-illegal-forest-clearance-in-indonesia.
Through The Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)
you can also read more from Eco Watch
The director of a major palm oil company in Indonesia has been found guilty of illegally clearing peat forest in Sumatra and sentenced to 8 months in jail. The director of PT Kallista Alam was also fined 150 million rupiah (about 13,000 US$), with a further 3-month sentence if the fine is not paid. PT Kallista Alam is appealing the verdict. For more, visit http://time2transcend.wordpress.com/2014/07/16/palm-oil-company-director-sentenced-to-jail-for-illegal-forest-clearance-in-indonesia.
Through The Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)
you can also read more from Eco Watch
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
100
Focal Length
38mm
Camera
Canon EOS 600D

The director of a major palm oil company in Indonesia has been found guilty of illegally clearing peat forest in Sumatra and sentenced to 8 months in jail. The director of PT Kallista Alam was also fined 150 million rupiah (about 13,000 US$), with a further 3-month sentence if the fine is not paid. PT Kallista Alam is appealing the verdict. For more, visit http://time2transcend.wordpress.com/2014/07/16/palm-oil-company-director-sentenced-to-jail-for-illegal-forest-clearance-in-indonesia.

Through The Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

you can also read more from Eco Watch

(Source: scienceyoucanlove)


First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10
It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10
It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10
It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10
It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10
It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

First Year Fieldtrip to Cape Conran turns 10

It was birthday celebrations all around for the first year SLE114 Introduction to Parks and Wildlife Conservation Biology students and staff as the fieldtrip to Cape Conran ran for the tenth consecutive year.  One hundred first year students attended the camp this year and worked closely with Deakin staff and our industry partners in the DEPI Southern Ark team. The students caught over 300 small mammals, including bandicoots, potoroos, possums, gliders, antechinus and native rats and learnt the skills involved in correct handling, identifying, sexing and in many cases micro-chipping these animals.  Other activities undertaken included GPS and GIS exercises, radio-tracking, camera trapping and bird surveys.  Our Head of School, Professor Guang Shi also attended the fieldtrip this year, experiencing the program as a student would as well as joining in the 10 year celebrations with Deakin and DEPI. It was great to have Guang along!

Inquiry into environmental biosecurityOn 26 June 2014, the Federal Senate referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee an inquiry into the adequacy of arrangements to prevent the entry and establishment of invasivespecies likely to harm Australia’s natural environment for report by 3 December 2014. You can have your say!

The Committee prefers to receive submissions online as an attached document by accessing the committee website and selecting the Upload Submission Online link https://senate.aph.gov.au/submissions/pages/logon.aspx. Alternatively, submissions may be emailed as an attached document to ec.sen@aph.gov.au.

The Committee will consider all submissions, and may invite individuals and organisations to give evidence at a public hearing.

Yes, the picture is of an introduced bird - the Rock Dove or ‘Feral Pigeon’!

Inquiry into environmental biosecurity
On 26 June 2014, the Federal Senate referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee an inquiry into the adequacy of arrangements to prevent the entry and establishment of invasive
species likely to harm Australia’s natural environment for report by 3 December 2014. You can have your say!

The Committee prefers to receive submissions online as an attached document by accessing the committee website and selecting the Upload Submission Online link https://senate.aph.gov.au/submissions/pages/logon.aspx. Alternatively, submissions may be emailed as an attached document to ec.sen@aph.gov.au.

The Committee will consider all submissions, and may invite individuals and organisations to give evidence at a public hearing.

Yes, the picture is of an introduced bird - the Rock Dove or ‘Feral Pigeon’!

Congratulations Julia!
Deakin honours student recently was awarded the runner up prize for best short talk at the Australasian Society for the Study of Conservation Biology conference held at Katoomba, NSW. Julia’s work on beaks and thermoregulation in shorebirds has featured previously on this Blog. Well done Julia, and well done also to her Principle Supervisor, Dr Matt Symonds.

Congratulations Julia!

Deakin honours student recently was awarded the runner up prize for best short talk at the Australasian Society for the Study of Conservation Biology conference held at Katoomba, NSW. Julia’s work on beaks and thermoregulation in shorebirds has featured previously on this Blog. Well done Julia, and well done also to her Principle Supervisor, Dr Matt Symonds.

Most Cool Leafhopper (Cicadellidae: Ledrinae) Camo
This stunning leafhopper nymph, on scribbly gum (Eucalyptus rossii), only revealed itself when it shifted slightly as I photographed ants nearby. It has to be one of my favorite camouflage images because of the beautiful colour and pattern match of the insect and the tree bark. Initially it can be difficult to figure out what you are looking at but the crops help to show insecty details like the eye in the third image.
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
100mm
Camera
Canon EOS 20D
Most Cool Leafhopper (Cicadellidae: Ledrinae) Camo
This stunning leafhopper nymph, on scribbly gum (Eucalyptus rossii), only revealed itself when it shifted slightly as I photographed ants nearby. It has to be one of my favorite camouflage images because of the beautiful colour and pattern match of the insect and the tree bark. Initially it can be difficult to figure out what you are looking at but the crops help to show insecty details like the eye in the third image.
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
100mm
Camera
Canon EOS 20D
Most Cool Leafhopper (Cicadellidae: Ledrinae) Camo
This stunning leafhopper nymph, on scribbly gum (Eucalyptus rossii), only revealed itself when it shifted slightly as I photographed ants nearby. It has to be one of my favorite camouflage images because of the beautiful colour and pattern match of the insect and the tree bark. Initially it can be difficult to figure out what you are looking at but the crops help to show insecty details like the eye in the third image.
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
100mm
Camera
Canon EOS 20D
Most Cool Leafhopper (Cicadellidae: Ledrinae) Camo
This stunning leafhopper nymph, on scribbly gum (Eucalyptus rossii), only revealed itself when it shifted slightly as I photographed ants nearby. It has to be one of my favorite camouflage images because of the beautiful colour and pattern match of the insect and the tree bark. Initially it can be difficult to figure out what you are looking at but the crops help to show insecty details like the eye in the third image.
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
100mm
Camera
Canon EOS 20D

Most Cool Leafhopper (Cicadellidae: Ledrinae) Camo

This stunning leafhopper nymph, on scribbly gum (Eucalyptus rossii), only revealed itself when it shifted slightly as I photographed ants nearby. It has to be one of my favorite camouflage images because of the beautiful colour and pattern match of the insect and the tree bark. Initially it can be difficult to figure out what you are looking at but the crops help to show insecty details like the eye in the third image.

(Source: nick-porch)

It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
500
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
80mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
400
Focal Length
123mm
Camera
Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
400
Focal Length
123mm
Camera
Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
100
Focal Length
61mm
Camera
Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
100
Focal Length
95mm
Camera
Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL
It’s DasyuridDay
The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
125
Focal Length
84mm
Camera
Canon EOS 300D DIGITAL

It’s DasyuridDay

The family dasyuridae is a diverse group of carnivorous marsupials containing species as diverse as the Tasmanian Devil through to the tiny planigales. Here a few images of some of the smaller dasyurid species we have caught on field programs and research.  The top image is a swamp antechinus (Antechinus minimus) caught in Cape Otway as part of Wildlife Field Studies (SLE302), then we have a dusky antechinus (Antechinus swainsonii) caught at Cape Conran on our first year field program (SLE114). The following 3 images are the common dunnart (Sminthopsis murina) which we catch in both the mallee region and Grampians as part of our fire research programs. For their tiny size they always try to bluff the person handling them (very cute). The final 2 images are southern ningaui (Ningaui yvonneae) a cute arid zone species.  These are just some of the many dasyurid species we encounter on field programs. They are always a favourite with students for their cuteness value. As they are marsupials they also have a little ‘pouch’, and if caught at the right time of year you get to see the little ‘jelly beans’ in the pouch. Too cool.

Australian Story: The Game Changer

The Thin Green Line!

Last night ABC Australian Story aired an amazing report a truly inspiring story of Sean Willmore and his foundation the Thin Green Line!.  Including how Dame Jane Goodall has become a proud supporter of the Thin Green Line and Sean’s work to support rangers in the line of duty around the world on the bloody global war against poachers. 

1 of 32
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...